Tax Reform

Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities.

<p>Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities. </p>

PHOENIX—In a special session that began today, the Arizona Legislature is considering a proposal for a one-cent sales tax increase that would be sent to voters in May.

The City of Phoenix is considering adding a tax on groceries. The Goldwater Institute's Starlee Rhoades told FOX 10 why it is not a good idea.

Watch it here

Phoenix--Today the Goldwater Institute released its 2010 "100 Ideas for 100 Days," an annual handbook designed to provide Arizona's elected officials with a stable of ideas to help meet their constitutional obligation to protect individual rights and promote limited government.

Protecting individual rights and promoting limited government aren’t just buzzwords. Those are the constitutional obligations of our elected officials. The Arizona Constitution explains this clearly in Article II, Section 2.

The State of Arizona is lobbying itself. Whether it is for all-day kindergarten, expansive redevelopment powers, or a host of other issues, government entities are exploring and acting on their lobbying options. The consequence: Government interests become pitted against taxpayers’ interests. From 2000 to 2005, three counties—Maricopa, Pima, and Mohave—spent more than $3 million to lobby. During the same period, the Department of Transportation, State Parks, and the Governor’s Office spent more than $1.8 million to lobby. Likewise, the cities of Tucson, Mesa, and Phoenix exhausted more than $2 million of taxpayer funds for lobbying purposes.

Executive Summary

The annual Goldwater Institute Legislative Report Card considers how well Arizona legislators are fulfilling their constitutional obligation to uphold liberty. The report scores legislators on 305 votes across four categories: education, constitutional government, regulation, and tax and budget. The primary criterion is whether a vote for or against each bill expands or restricts liberty.

The Goldwater Institute's Dr. Byron Schlomach went on the James Allen Show on KKNT to continue the discussion of the 10-part Thinking Economically series.

Listen to it here

There is no silver bullet that will transform Arizona's economy. And we're not in a competition with other states for a fixed number of "good" jobs. With unemployment at almost 10 percent, any job is a good job. We need more jobs, not to rearrange them.

Struggling to close a $14 million budget deficit as of June, the Gilbert Town Council passed three measures to increase taxes. But after seeing 2,400 citizen signatures and hearing dozens of speakers protest the tax hike at a council meeting, the council unanimously repealed the tax hikes.

You don't have to spend years poring over economic textbooks to understand that the more you tax something, the less of it is created or consumed. That's one reason tobacco taxes are so high; the government wants to discourage its consumption. And tobacco use is falling partly as a result of this policy.

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