Tax Reform

Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities.

<p>Americans are a hard-working bunch and should keep what they earn. Our ideas for tax reform reduce the burden of taxes while ensuring governments have the resources to focus on core responsibilities. </p>

Arizona's leaders should resist calls for more taxation and spending in the name of economic development, a Phoenix-based conservative public policy groups says.

The Goldwater Institute unveiled its latest report, "Assessing Arizona's Economy: Boom or Bust?" during a June 6 luncheon.

Using public funds to try to launch a genomics and biotech industry in Arizona is not the most effective use of taxpayer money for economic development, according to the author of a new study released today by the Goldwater Institute, a Phoenix-based think tank.

In a study called "Assessing Arizona's Economy-Boom or Bust?" author Robert Franciosi said low taxes and low regulatory burdens are the only proven ways for government to promote long-term economic growth.

Engaged citizens make for good governments. That’s the central idea behind the ninth annual Goldwater Institute Legislative Report Card, which takes into account 375 votes during the first session of Arizona’s fiftieth legislature. The result is a citizen-friendly tool for evaluating legislators’ votes against a simple, important standard: their impact on liberty.

Property taxes in Maricopa County are going up 18 percent. The Goldwater Institute's Byron Schlomach talked to KTVK Channel 3 about what this means for your wallet.

In his blog Ideas, Santa Clara University economist David Friedman (yes, he's Milton's son) wrote about the cost of eyeglasses. He was curious why a new frame and set of lenses costs less than $10 online, but five times that amount or more at most stores.

Governor Napolitano's office has warned there might not be enough revenue to cut taxes this year. That is, as Barry Goldwater might have put it, Poppycock! There is plenty of revenue. The problem is that everyone at the capitol wants to spend it all.

Total revenue for fiscal year 2007 was $9.5 billion. Sales and individual taxes made up 90 percent of that amount. The corporate income tax represented nine percent, or just over $900 million.

May 1st was a bad day for liberty. First, the state-wide smoking ban went into effect. Then, the House released a $10.6 billion budget proposal. What else should we expect on May Day?

Arizona's conservative majority in the House is asking taxpayers to fund a budget that is $276 million larger than what the democratic governor asked for. It gives tens of millions of dollars in across-the-board pay increases to government employees and continues to subsidize the biotech chimera.

New York Times columnist and Princeton economist Paul Krugman is among the most passionate advocates for honest-to-God socialized medicine. His solution to Americas health care problems is the Veterans Health Administration, whose success story is one of the best kept secrets in the American policy debate.

In light of recent events, the secret seems to be how shabbily government hospitals treat their patients.

In last year's state budget negotiations, everyone was thrown a bone.­ The spending lobby received huge increases in government spending and taxpayers benefited from income and property tax relief.­ What a difference a year makes.­

From all her talk about investing, one might think Governor Janet Napolitano is trying to channel Warren Buffet. She's always talking about investing in something education, bio-tech, downtown.

But she's not really investing, she's spending. In her first term, General Fund spending surged 70 percent, a bigger increase than any other governor in the past two decades. Not only is general spending up, debt spending is increasing $2 billion a year. Is all this "investing" really good for Arizona?

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