State Powers

The states are powerful enough to stand up to the federal government when it violates citizens’ rights. Learn how we can better leverage the power of states.

<p>The states are powerful enough to stand up to the federal government when it violates citizens’ rights. Learn how we can better leverage the power of states.</p>

In a showdown between the Obama administration and the town made famous by the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, the U.S. Forest Service is refusing to allow historic Tombstone, Ariz., to restore its municipal water supply after it was destroyed by torrential floods and mudslides in the summer of 2011.

The Goldwater Institute has long opposed the federal health care law as constitutionally questionable and a governmental intrusion on individual freedom. Nick Dranias, director of Goldwater's Center for Constitutional Government, was interviewed on Arizona Week.

"Liberty took a body blow, but it's not down for the count," he said. "We still have a challenge to the Independent Payment Advisory Board, what Sarah Palin called the 'death panel,' which is pending.

At the time of this writing, only a few hours have passed since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its calamitous decision upholding the bulk of the federal health care law. I share in your disappointment, surprise and frustration. 

By Fernanda Santos, New York Times

The U.S. Congress has been deadlocked for about three years over re-authorizing the federal highway program. During that time, they have passed temporary extensions of the program. The ninth extension expires at the end of this month.

By Diane Cohen and Michael F. Cannon, published by the Cato Institute 

By Samantha Bare, Cronkite News

State governments have a powerful—but often overlooked—weapon against the federal government’s overreach.  With it, the states could have conceivably blocked passage of the Obama Administration’s healthcare law. That power is found in Article V of the U.S. Constitution, and enables states to seek constitutional amendments.
 

By Ron Arnold, Washington Examiner

It's bad enough when your town has to worry about high mountain forest fires. It's even worse when the scorched earth left behind gives way to monsoon rains that drive mud and boulders smashing into your municipal water pipeline system. And it's much, much worse still when President Obama's Forest Service won't let you repair the damage, ostensibly because that might disturb the wilderness.

Historic Tombstone takes on the feds over water rights

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