Government Accountability

Back-room deals and closed doors are not the stuff of free governments. Our work is making governments more transparent and accountable to citizens.

<p>Back-room deals and closed doors are not the stuff of free governments. Our work is making governments more transparent and accountable to citizens.</p>

The Goldwater Institute's Clint Bolick went live on Channel 3 to talk about the lawsuit against the City of Glendale for not releaseing public records on negotiations with the Phoenix Coyotes, and to talk about Tempe tattoo case, which the Goldwater Institute recently won.

Rumors are circulating that the City of Glendale will offer the Phoenix Coyotes up to $20 million to stay in town, but Glendale is saying it won't offer the Coyotes anything. Either way, the Goldwater Institute is watching Glendale closely, even filing a lawsuit to get public records on the Coyotes negotiations. Carrie Ann Sitren spoke to KPNX Channel 12 about the situation.

Watch it here.

Hockey in the Phoenix desert has proved to be less than profitable. So it wasn’t surprising when the Phoenix Coyotes hockey team filed for bankruptcy in 2009. What was surprising was the lengths the City of Glendale would go to to keep potential team buyers from moving the Coyotes to colder – and more profitable – climes.

Phoenix--Today the Goldwater Institute filed suit against the City of Glendale for denying a public records request regarding the potential sale of the Coyotes hockey team.

The Goldwater Institute's Byron Schlomach appeared on KFYI to discuss how we are seeing more and more federal government intervention in the economy lately, and why such intervention can only make things worse.

 

The Goldwater Institute's Byron Schlomach appeared on KFYI to discuss how we are seeing more and more federal government intervention in the economy lately, and why such intervention can only make things worse.

Listen to Part One here.

Listen to Part Two here.

Phoenix--Continuing its efforts to monitor state government activities, the Goldwater Institute announces that renowned Arizona journalist Mark Flatten has joined the organization as an investigative reporter. Mr. Flatten's investigative reports have led to changes in the law and prompted numerous federal and state investigations.

One of the most effective ways to measure a law-enforcement agency’s performance is by the percentage of crimes it solves, known in legal circles as its “clearance rate.” Criminal investigations can be cleared in one of two ways: by arrest or by “exception.” Clearances by exception must meet rigid criteria that the FBI has used for 80 years.  Essentially, the perpetrator must be known to the police but cannot be apprehended due to special circumstances such as the suspect’s death. Although the criteria governing exceptional clearance are clear and objective, some law-enforcement agencies skirt the rules of exception to clear cases that do not meet the criteria, essentially declaring unsolved crimes solved to inflate the agency’s clearance rate. Clearing cases that have not been solved deprives crime victims of justice and may compromise public safety.

The Goldwater Institute released a policy brief called Justice Denied which accuses the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office of improperly clearing many of its cases by exception, and calls on the legislature to require law enforcement agencies to post detailed information on clearance rates. Clint Bolick and a rape victim who had her case cleared by exception spoke at a news conference held at the Goldwater Institute.

 

 

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