Government Accountability

Back-room deals and closed doors are not the stuff of free governments. Our work is making governments more transparent and accountable to citizens.

<p>Back-room deals and closed doors are not the stuff of free governments. Our work is making governments more transparent and accountable to citizens.</p>

The Goldwater Institute is ready to give the once over to a possible sale of the Phoenix Coyotes hockey team to see if a deal is kosher with Arizona law prohibiting government gifts to private businesses.

Sometimes important regulatory and tort reforms come in small packages. One example is SB1153, sponsored by Senator Andy Biggs. It proposes a simple reform to insurance law, holding responsible a negligent car renter to pay for injuries or damages he's caused.

As national Sunshine Week comes to a close, some legislators are trying to close out the sunshine. A new proposal would expand a current exemption to Arizona’s Public Records Laws and limit public information at universities.

What is the Freedom of Information Act?

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was a 1966 act which gave Americans increased access to federal government documents and records. It was amended in 1996 by the Electronic Freedom of Information Act amendments to provide access to this information electronically.

Ignorance of the law is no excuse. At least that’s what I’ve been told. But there are high costs of learning about every law that might possibly impact you these days. You can randomly violate laws without even knowing it, given how intrusive and nonsensical they can be, and how often they change.

Sometimes important regulatory and tort reforms come in small packages. One example is SB1286, sponsored by Senator John McComish. It proposes a simple reform to insurance law, which currently requires a completely innocent car rental company and a completely negligent car renter to be equally responsible for paying for injuries caused by the renter.

By Kelly Nolan, Wall Street Journal

Arizona Republic editorial

Enough already.

The Goldwater Institute recently filed a lawsuit challenging Phoenix’s “release time” practice that sends six city police officers to work as full-time union managers, 35 to work as part-time union representatives, and one to work as a union lobbyist. Although these employees are released from city duties to perform union duties, taxpayers continue to pay the officers’ salaries and benefits.

Arizona's Auditor General recently released a report detailing how the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) fraudulently put employees of three non-profits on the district's payroll: the Arizona Community College Association; the Arizona Business and Education Coalition; and the East Valley Partnership.

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