Education Reform

Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career.

<p>Too often, the traditional public-school model fails students and teachers. Charter schools, scholarship tax credits, and merit pay are giving students a better education and teachers a better career. </p>

Matt Ladner discusses the Goldwater Institute's two cases, Charter Schools v. Horne and Turken v. Gordon on KVOI's Inside Track.

We live in a world that’s becoming increasingly standardized, despite the dizzying fragmentation of our society that the Internet has produced.

We need to have some common technological ground in order to make the Web work, forcing nearly everyone to have some familiarity with PCs and how they operate. The dominance of deep-pocketed corporations has crowded anybody who isn’t a Wal-Mart or Michael’s or Chick-Fil-A out of the East Valley’s power centers.

Special thanks to Governor Jan Brewer for calling a special session to rescue the 473 disabled and foster children left stranded by the Arizona Supreme Court's ruling that struck down their school voucher program, and to the legislators who crafted and passed a new tax credit to help them.

The Goldwater Institute released a new study titled New Millennium Schools: Delivering Six-Figure Teacher Salaries in Return for Outstanding Student Learning Gains. In this report, my coauthors Mark Francis, Greg Stone and I argue that the United States has made a tragic error in emphasizing teacher quantity rather than teacher quality.

The New York Times printed a must read article on Arizona State University and its President, Michael Crow:

 

The Goldwater Institute's Matthew Ladner was on KJZZ's Here and Now program to talk about the proposed budgets and their effects on education funding.

A demographer recently displayed a map of the Southwestern United States at an academic conference and predicted it would become “the Appalachia of the 21st Century.”
 
Southwestern states, among others, have rapidly growing Hispanic populations which are transforming their K-12 demographic profiles into “majority-minority.” Hispanic students score lower on standardized tests, are more likely to drop out of school, and are much less likely to graduate from college.
 

Philosopher John Rawls argued that answers to societal problems should be decided as if we lived behind a "veil of ignorance." Behind the veil, no one would know what his or her position in life would be. You would not know whether you would grow up the child of a billionaire or poor in the inner-city. His theory was that this veil creates an incentive to create a path out of the latter, far less desirable, scenario.

On March 10, Pres. Barack Obama gave a major education speech before the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. In that speech, he declared that Secretary of Education Arne Duncan “will use only one test when deciding what ideas to support with your precious tax dollars: It’s not whether an idea is liberal or conservative, but whether it works.”

Phoenix--We hear it over and over: teaching is one of the most important professions in the country. So why is it hard to attract the top college graduates to the classroom? The answer is simple: schools treat teachers like factory workers rather than professionals.
 
"We simply cannot draw more people into teaching without addressing the elephant in the room," says Matthew Ladner, Ph.D., vice president of research at the Goldwater Institute. "Teaching, as currently practiced, is an unattractive career to many people because it does not reward merit."
 

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