Constitutional Rights

Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected.

<p>Government can be freedom’s best friend when it protects citizens’ constitutional rights. Here’s how the Goldwater Institute is ensuring your rights are protected. </p>

Dipping your feet in a pool of “Spa Fish” is a trendy new way to create baby-bottom-smooth feet. Cindy Vong began offering this service a few years ago in Gilbert, Ariz., a growing city outside Phoenix. The therapy historically has been used to treat psoriasis patients in the Middle East and Asia. Patients dip their feet into baths of tiny, toothless Garra Rufa fish that nibble off dry skin, and voila.

Barry Goodfield is a world-renowned psychologist who lives in the Phoenix metro area. His recognized expertise in non-verbal cues puts him in such demand that he regularly consults with international diplomats. He holds two patents in psychotherapeutic methods. But, if you’d like to give the Goodfield Institute a call for an appointment, as they say in New York, “Fuhgeddaboudit.”

An annual event that attracts more than 1,000 political, business, civic and philanthropic leaders, the Goldwater Dinner is the year’s can’t-miss event.

James Madison observed that American federalism provides “a double security . . . to the rights of the people.” To this end, state constitutions are replete with provisions that lack federal counterparts. One such provision found in many state constitutions, including Arizona’s, is a ban on “special laws.”

The National Organization for Women (NOW) wants a truce in the Mommy Wars - the fight between women who stay home with children and moms who work. But does their agenda accomplish that aim?

NOW lobbies for regulations requiring family friendly policies at businesses, government funding for early childhood education, and giving stay-at-home moms greater access to entitlement programs. But a government giveaway to working moms reduces a stay-at-home mom's value to her family and vice versa.

Bob McClay, with KTAR

PHOENIX -- Voters who want to wear something that makes a political statement when they go to the polls in November can go right ahead.

When Diane Wickberg went to vote in Flagstaff in 2010, she was stopped at the door because of the shirt she was wearing.

"On the front it said ‘Flagstaff Tea Party', and on the back it said ‘Protecting the Constitution'," said Starlee Rhodes of the Goldwater Institute.

By Craig Outhier, "Best of the Valley," Phoenix Magazine, November 2012

Those frustrated with the Supreme Court’s ruling that the federal government can tax Americans who do not purchase government-approved health insurance may find some consolation going forward, because NFIB v. Sebelius will not be the last word on the federal law. Over the next few years, courts across the country will hear a number of legal challenges that share a common theme: even read as a tax, the federal health insurance law is unconstitutional. 

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