Business & Job Creation

Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.

<p>Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.</p>

Special deals between cities and hand-picked developers have exempted more than $2 billion in development projects from property taxes in Arizona, shifting the tax burden to surrounding property owners and creating a competitive disadvantage for other businesses, an investigation by the Goldwater Institute has found.

The Goldwater Institute's Dr. Byron Schlomach went on KFNN to talk about cities giving subsidies to preferred businesses.

Listen to it here

PHOENIX--At a Superior Court hearing, Maricopa County Judge Kenneth Mangum decided the City of Phoenix must turn over public records related to a deal it is making with the Wyndham Hotel by February 19, 2010.

Too often “profit” is equated with “greed.” The word implies to many an unrelenting seeking of gain, even at the expense and suffering of others. This reasoning implies that one man’s profit is derived from another man’s loss.

Phoenix--Today in a unanimous decision the Arizona Supreme Court declared that government subsidies to encourage development violate the Gift Clause of the Arizona Constitution unless the developer offers tangible benefits of equal value in return. The ruling clarifies previous decisions the court believed were confusing and applied the rule prospectively. The Court declined to invalidate the CityNorth subsidy and sent the case back to the Arizona Court of Appeals to consider other legal challenges.

Goldwater Institute attorney Carrie Ann Sitren was live on KTVK Channel 3 to explain two new lawsuits filed by the Goldwater Institute--one against the City of Tempe and one against the Arizona Board of Cosmetology.

Watch it here

The Goldwater Institute claims that a lawsuit it filed against the city of Tempe has forced changes in the deal between the city and a British developer to build an aquarium at the Arizona Mills Mall.

The folks at Goldwater felt the city was giving unfair incentives to Sea Life, a division of U.K.-based Merlin Entertainment Group, to build the aquarium in Tempe.

Frankly, any company willing to build anything at the crime-riddled Arizona Mills Mall should be given a medal of bravery, not tax breaks.

A Tempe development agreement that includes a $218,000 incentive for the developers of Sea Life Aquarium will remain in place while a judge sets a hearing to decide whether the subsidy is illegal.

Meanwhile, City Attorney Andrew Ching said as a precautionary measure, Tempe is drafting a new agreement that spells out more specifically how it complies with state law.

A court hearing Wednesday between Tempe and the Goldwater Institute explored the leeway cities have to woo developers of high-profile projects with public money.

When the Arizona Board of Cosmetology told salon owner Cindy Vong she couldn't use small fish to eat the dead skin off of customers' feet--a popular Asian therapy--the Goldwater Institute decided to go to bat for her.

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