Business & Job Creation

Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.

<p>Businesses need a friendly and fair business environment so they can compete, innovate, and create jobs. We’re keeping politicians from playing favorites by offering special deals and tax breaks to the favored few.</p>

Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon tussled with the Goldwater Institute Tuesday over its lawsuit challenging the city's subsidy for a mixed-use development near Loop 101 and Tatum Boulevard.

Gordon faulted Goldwater for releasing information that showed the city spent $100,000 on outside counsel to defend the lawsuit challenging a tax rebate for Chicago-based Thomas J. Klutznick Co., developer of the 5.5 million-square-foot CityNorth project.

The Tempe City Council on Thursday blocked a tattoo studio from opening, unanimously backing a neighborhood group's efforts to change the look and reputation of a stretch of Scottsdale Road.

It's a fight that's increasingly common, pitting old-school impressions of seedy tattoo parlors catering to a low-class clientele against the current, widespread acceptance of permanent body art by young people and others, regardless of class.

Development impact fees are supposed to be a legal method of charging new residents and new businesses up-front for government infrastructure they will need, instead of putting an additional burden on current residents who already contribute their fair share.

Six small-business-owners, including a Senator and a one-time legislative candidate, filed a lawsuit today challenging nearly $100 million in tax subsidies Phoenix gave to the developer of a planned mall.

The lawsuit, Turken v. Gordon, was filed in Maricopa County Superior Court and seeks an injunction against the subsidy and to restore the constitutional ban on subsidies.

If successful, the suit would tie the hands of city officials wishing to offer subsidies to lure companies away from neighboring cities.

At last week's mayoral debate, the only one we'll have in this year's lopsided race, Mayor Phil Gordon was asked a very good question and gave a very disappointing answer.

Knowing what we know now, the moderator asked, did Gordon regret the city's promise to hand over $97 million in tax revenue to the developers of City North?

PHOENIX - Early voting started Monday Aug. 13 for the Sept. 11 Phoenix elections.

Citizens in the odd-numbered districts will have an opportunity to elect a new council member for their respective districts, except in Claude Mattox's District 5, unless theres a registered write-in candidate.

And, they'll all get to decide whether to reseat incumbent Mayor Phil Gordon or replace him with either the Republican candidate Steve Lory or the Independent write-in candidate Mark Yannone.

There are also six propositions on the ballot.

An Arizona state senator and several business owners filed a lawsuit today challenging Phoenix's nearly $100 million incentive to the private CityNorth development.

The Goldwater Institute is representing the business owners in the lawsuit, which could have implications for other cities statewide, and could impact the competition for new businesses between Phoenix and Scottsdale along their shared border.

The Goldwater Institute filed suit on Wednesday challenging Phoenix's $97.4 million subsidy to CityNorth, a mixed-use development under construction in northeast Phoenix.

The lawsuit, filed in Maricopa County Superior Court, seeks an injunction against the subsidy and to restore the constitutional ban on subsidies.

The city of Surprise is facing criticism over a $240 million sales tax rebate it is giving Westcor to build a vast retail, office and residential project on farmland next to the planned Loop 303 freeway.

The incentive package is for the shopping mall developer's Prasada project. Prasada will include a regional mall, car dealerships, shopping centers, as many as 13,000 homes and other commercial space.

Arizona's bioscience sector has added jobs, drawn more federal research money and created companies, but the state still needs to attract more venture capital for the state to become a major player in the industry. That's the assessment of the status of Arizona's bioscience businesses after four years of a major public and private-sector effort to expand the industry in Arizona, according to Battelle, a Columbus, Ohio-based technology research organization, which wrote a 10-year plan for the state's bioscience industry.

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